Archive for April, 2012

2012 Behind the Scenes Pottery Crawl in Seagrove, NC, is a Fundraiser for the Northern Moore Family Resource Center – May 12, 2012

April 29, 2012

On Saturday, May 12, 2012, from 10am to5pm, whether you are a pottery newbie or a seasoned collector, you’ll enjoy the Behind the Scenes Pottery Crawl and help out deserving children and families.

Spend a fun-filled Saturday meeting the artists, touring their studios, and admiring their creations. Come check out 14 memorable potteries in a self-guided car tour. Each pottery will have a unique culinary delight with a wine pairing (beef tenderloin on rounds of French bread, shrimp served with remoulade and red sauces, open-faced pork sliders, an elegant almond torte, to name a few), and demonstrations focusing on different aspects of the craft – from shaping at the wheel, to glazing, to firing techniques. Or you can roll up your sleeves and make a pot yourself with the help of an expert. Last year’s participants were inspired by the beautiful countryside, the world class artistic talent of Seagrove, NC, and the unique way the featured artists live and work.


From Avery Pottery & Tileworks

The 2nd annual Behind the Scenes Pottery Crawl is organized by the Northern Moore Family Resource Center (The Resource Center) which is a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit organization established in 1996 to serve children and families in northern Moore County, NC. The area that The Resource Center serves has been decimated by the departure of manufacturing over the last 30 years and it has resulted in too many children living in poverty. The Resource Center helps at-risk children succeed academically by offering, among other things, after school programs and summer camps. The Resource Center is a United Way agency and their six-week free summer day camp is partially funded by the United Way.  All proceeds from the Pottery Crawl will help children and strengthen local families. Potters will generously donate 15 percent of all sales during the event to the Resource Center.

The Pottery Crawl is much more than a one dimensional art gallery experience. It’s a ‘Behind the Scenes’ look at how and where the art is created. It’s about the uniqueness of each individual potter. To visit the potters is to immerse oneself in their creative world. For them life and work are fused together by their artistry, as many live and work in the same environment. Often they live on winding country roads, and when you venture down them you may find a beautiful sculpture garden, a lush pond, a picturesque log cabin, or a sturdy converted barn.  It’s quiet in the country except for the sound of the clay fired wind chimes, or the crow of a rooster.


View of Jugtown Pottery

And of course, there is the art itself. On this pottery tour you’ll find a rich diversity of styles, colors, shapes and sizes that range from the decorative to the utilitarian. You’ll encounter pieces that are worthy of museum lighting, as well as everyday treasures like place settings, serving bowls and mugs that will jazz up a room or any meal. Every potter is an artist with his/her own unique style.

Seagrove’s pottery tradition dates back to the 18th century, before the American Revolution, due to the high quality of the local clay. Today it’s known for the high concentration of potters, the unsurpassed artistic talent, and the eclectic mix of people – some with roots eight generations deep and others drawn here from around the world.


From the Ground Up Pottery

The following are the potters on the tour: Avery Pottery and Tileworks, Ben Owen Pottery, Blue Hen Pottery, Bulldog Pottery, Chris Luther Pottery, Dean and Martin Pottery, Frank Neef Pottery, From the Ground Up, Great White Oak Pottery, Jugtown Pottery, Luck’s Ware, Old Gap Pottery, Seagrove Stoneware, Studio Touya, and Westmoore Pottery.

Don’t miss this unique event or the opportunity to help local kids and their families. And it all happens on Mother’s Day weekend. So spare Mom that tired gift and spend an unforgettable day with her instead! After seeing the bounty, you may never again give a generic store-bought gift.

Individual tickets are $45 and Patron tickets are $100, and they include a commemorative pottery piece. Mother’s Day packages are available for $150. The package includes two tickets and several gifts for mom – the commemorative pottery piece filled with chocolates and a bottle of wine. Participants will receive a ticket and program for the event, with a map highlighting all of the participating potteries.  Tickets and programs may be picked up at the Resource Center, 130 S. Middleton Street in Robbins, NC, where guests will also have the opportunity to learn more about the programs that the Resource Center offers, or at The North Carolina Pottery Center, 233 East Avenue in Seagrove.

The Resource Center will also raffle off four-4 piece place settings of tableware from Dean and Martin Pottery and from Avery Pottery and Tileworks. They will also raffle off a salad set, plus salad bowls from Seagrove Stoneware.   Raffle tickets may be purchased separately from tickets to the event, and winners do not have to be present at the drawing. The drawings will take place at 5:30pm at the Resource Center on the day of the event. Raffle tickets for the dinnerware are $10 apiece, and you can designate whether you want to be included in the raffle for the set from Dean and Martin Pottery or Avery Pottery and Tileworks.  Tickets for the salad set are $5 apiece, and for the set of six salad bowls tickets are $1 apiece. Pictures of all items to be raffled will be posted on our website in early April.


From Dean & Martin Pottery

This event is made possible in large part by contributions from St. Josephs of the Pines and Wachovia Wells Fargo.  St. Josephs of the Pines has an active presence in northern Moore County, with its Providence Place development in Robbins – lovely one bedroom apartments for seniors, plus it brings its fully equipped Semi to Robbins for two days each month where local residents can be seen by the Moore Free Care Clinic, meet with the Sandhills/Moore Coalition for Human Care and the Benefit Bank, and soon will be able to see dentists free of charge. Wachovia Wells Fargo provided funding to support the financial education classes that the Resource Center offers as part of its IDA program.

To purchase raffle tickets or tickets to the event, visit the Resource Center website at (www.nmfrc.com), or send checks payable to the Northern Moore Family Resource Center to P.O. Box 190, Robbins, NC 27325 or call the Resource Center at 910/948-4324.

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NC Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, is Looking for Some Angels in a Haystack – Could You Be One?

April 24, 2012

Don’t you just hate it when you think you have your budget all figured out to make it through the next week, month or year – then out of the blue – the car needs a major repair or the air conditioners gives out on the hottest day of the year? What’s the saying – “Stuff Happens!”

The NC Pottery Center needs our help and I think they are worth it. Here’s their problem:

The NC Pottery Center has recently experienced unforeseen maintenance issues and they are asking you as a supporter of the NCPC, or just someone who is looking for a good cause, for your help in paying for lighting repairs at the Center. They hope to raise $2,000 to cover these expenses.

They are asking that you please consider a monetary donation, becoming a new member, increasing your membership level, renewing your membership early, or buying a brick for your business or in memory/honor of someone.

The staff and board of the Pottery Center are working hard to keep the NCPC a viable museum and hope you will consider helping us.

If you can help, please visit their website at (www.ncpotterycenter.org) where you can make a quick online donation, or call then at 336/873-8430 and tell them you want to help. Thanks.

Patz Fowle of Hartsville, SC, Is Having A Busy Spring

April 17, 2012

On Apr. 28, from 10am-4pm, Fowle will participate in the Congaree Arts Festival at the SC State Museum in Columbia, SC, held on the grounds of the SC State Museum. She’ll have lots of her clay friends available to be purchased.


Whimsical Mystery Tour

Two of Fowle’s sculptures were chosen for the 2012 South Carolina Palmetto Hands Juried Exhibition presented during the 2012 North Charleston Arts Festival, hosted by the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department. The Palmetto Hands Exhibition will be at the Charleston Area Convention Center in North Charleston, SC, from May 5-12, 2012.


Palmetto Sprout

The book Patz Fowle in Progress was just published by Black Creek Arts Council in Hartsville, SC. Here’s what was written about it.

South Carolina artist Patz Fowle is no stranger to having images of her work published in text books or having her drawings used as illustrations for children’s books. She has even written her own children’s book, Remember When available on (www.Amazon.com).

Fowle can now add having a book about her unique clay handbuilding technique, the Patz Process, and the evolution of her artistic inspiration to her long list of accomplishments. Patz Fowle in Progress just arrived at the Black Creek Arts Center and copies of the book are headed to each public school library in Darlington County, SC.

Patz Fowle in Progress came about after Fowle completed an artist residency at each school in Darlington County during the 2010-11 school year. “One of the aims of the book is to show local young people that successful, practicing artists live and work in their communities,” said Fowle. “What better way than to show them than a book about an artist that they know and have worked with.”

Patz Fowle in Progress contains images of Fowle’s works from the 1980s up to some of her most recent, including her sculpture of famed topiary artist Pearl Fryar and painting of the multi-talented painter and performer Ilona Smithkin. Additionally, the book tells the story of Fowle’s inspiration for her clever clay creations and shows the artist at work on many of her whimsical sculptures.

The book was published by Black Creek Arts Council, which, along with the Darlington County School District through grants from the South Carolina Arts Commission, funded the artist residencies Fowle completed in 2010-11. Black Creek Arts Council’s Sub granting Program, which provided assistance for this project, is funded in part by the South Carolina Arts Commission, the John & Susan Bennett memorial Arts Fund of the Coastal Community Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

To get your copy of Patz Fowle in Progress, contact the Black Creek Arts Center by e-mail at (bartscounc@aol.com) or call 843/332-6234 or Patz Fowle at (patzfowle@yahoo.com).

Mint Museum in Charlotte, NC, Announces Five-Year Plan – Big News for Pottery Lovers

April 15, 2012

The Mint Museum in Charlotte, NC, has defined what its success will look like in five years. In a sweeping five-year strategic plan recently approved by its Board of Trustees, the museum adopted a new mission statement that outlines its role as an increasingly vital player on the national and international level. The new statement reads: “The Mint Museum is a leading, innovative museum of international art and design committed to engaging and inspiring all members of our global community.”

“The Mint’s new, enhanced mission invites and welcomes all of our community to engage with the museum in ways most relevant to them,” said Jay Everette, Wells Fargo’s senior vice president, community affairs manager and chair-elect of the Mint’s board of trustees. “Whether connecting through in-person or online education, visiting a compelling exhibition or attending a community event at one of our locations, the Mint is a resource for learning more about, and bringing meaning to, the world around us.”


From the opening of the Mint Museum Uptown

In the five-year plan, the museum has set ambitious goals including:

· Doubling annual attendance to 400,000 visitors, and increasing virtual visitors to 800,000 annually;
· Launching an aggressive plan to strengthen the museum’s collections through the acquisition of significant works of art;
· Increasing its digital reach, beginning with the launch of a new website in May;
· Organizing at least two traveling exhibitions per year with national and international impact, and securing at least three highly significant exhibitions from elsewhere annually;
· Tripling the number of museum members to 12,000 and increasing the number of individual investors by 50 percent;
· Completing a feasibility study of the renovation and re-envisioning of the museum’s Randolph Road location, to include such factors as a North Carolina Pottery Research Center, classroom space, studios, a children’s center, and increased public access to the museum’s library.

“This plan is a broad, inclusive call to action and a statement of The Mint Museum’s commitment to the fundamental relationship between artistic expression and community,” said Dr. Kathleen V. Jameson, President & CEO of the Mint. “All of the museum’s resources must be employed in service to the community, for The Mint Museum is a vital cultural resource for the region, and this plan charts our course.”

Over the course of the past year, museum staff, volunteers, and community leaders have worked together, in consultation with the Center for Intentional Leadership, to outline four strategic pillars to undergird the plan: amplifying the museum’s community relevance; strengthening the museum’s permanent collections and exhibitions; increasing learning and engagement opportunities throughout the region; and focusing on long-term sustainability. In addition, three overarching goals of improved technology, communication, and service are woven throughout the plan.

Employees, volunteers, and museum affiliate groups outlined dozens of specific tactics they will employ in support of the goals and strategies. Progress will be measured by such performance indicators as attendance, visitor surveys, increased participation in educational programs, and increased giving to the museum.

Many of the goals will be accomplished by refocusing existing resources, but others will require new forms of investment. The plan incorporates key planning and assessment strategies to determine the scope of critical priorities outlined by the museum.

“The museum must continue to build its collections, resources, support, and infrastructure to achieve national prominence as a center of excellence and inspiration,” said Jameson. “The arts increasingly play a critical role in the ‘creative economy’ and in cultural tourism, contributing to economic development and a high quality of life. The Mint Museum will play a leading role in this crucial aspect of our dynamic and changing environment with this pragmatic, thoughtful plan for sustainable growth.”

Added Richard T. “Stick” Williams, the Mint’s board of trustees chair and president, Duke Energy Foundation: “The Charlotte region has provided an extraordinary new uptown facility to The Mint Museum, and we must deliver excellence in return. This strategic plan is just the road map we need to accomplish that.”

Copies of the complete plan, and interviews with Dr. Jameson, are available upon request.


Mint Museum Uptown

As the oldest art museum in North Carolina, and the art museum with one of the largest collections between New Orleans and Washington, DC, The Mint Museum offers its visitors inspiring and transformative experiences through art from around the world via innovative collections, ground-breaking exhibitions, riveting educational programs, and profound scholarship. The Mint Museum is a non-profit, visual arts institution comprised of two dynamic facilities: Mint Museum Uptown and Mint Museum Randolph.

Located in what was the original branch of the United States Mint, Mint Museum Randolph opened in 1936 in Charlotte’s Eastover neighborhood as the first art museum in North Carolina. Today, in a beautiful park setting, intimate galleries invite visitors to engage with the art of the ancient Americas, ceramics and decorative arts, historic costume and fashionable dress, European and African art, among other collections. Resources include a reference library with over 18,000 volumes, a theater featuring lectures and performances, and a museum shop offering merchandise that complements both the permanent collection and special exhibitions.

Mint Museum Uptown houses the internationally renowned Craft + Design collection, as well as outstanding collections of American, contemporary, and European art. Designed by Machado and Silvetti Associates of Boston, the five-story, 145,000-square-foot facility combines inspiring architecture with cutting-edge exhibitions to provide visitors with unparalleled educational and cultural experiences. Located in the heart of Charlotte’s burgeoning center city, Mint Museum Uptown is an integral part of the Levine Center for the Arts, a cultural campus that includes the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art, the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts and Culture, the Knight Theater, and the Duke Energy Center. Mint Museum Uptown also features a wide range of visitor amenities, including the 240-seat James B. Duke Auditorium, the Lewis Family Gallery, art studios, a restaurant, and a museum shop.

For more information, check out (www.mintmuseum.org).

Lynda English Studio Gallery in Florence, SC, Offers Pottery Show and Sale – April 16, 2012

April 15, 2012

Spring is here and the Lynda English Studio Gallery in Florence, SC, is bringing in lots of new pottery. In addition to having new pottery, the gallery is having a fantastic sale with 20% off selected pieces from Ardie Praetorius, Doug Gray and Marty Biernbaum.

Come early while the selection is good.


Work by Marty Biernbaum

The Lynda English Studio Gallery is located at 403 Second Loop Road in Florence.

For more information, visit (www.lyndaenglishstudio.net) or call 843/673-9144.

2012 Madison County Potter’s Market Takes Place in Marshall, NC – April 28, 2012

April 9, 2012

The 2012 Madison County Potter’s Market takes place on Saturday, Apr. 28, 2012, from 9am-5pm at Marshall High Studios in downtown Marshall, NC.


Work by Ronan Kyle Peterson

The event will showcase the work of the 10 full time members of the Potters of Madison County and their 10 invited guest potters.

In the last decade, the quiet mountain towns and townships of Madison County have attracted an ever growing community of artists and craftspeople. Madison County’s rich rural and agricultural history and its inhabitants’ collective respect for tradition and craft make a natural setting for the production of handmade functional and sculptural ceramics. The Potters of Madison County was created in order to unite and acknowledge the skilled and diverse group of men and women currently creating work in an area not previously recognized as a stronghold for pottery in its own right.


Work by Alex Matisse

Participating artists include: Jim & Shirl Parmentier, Jules & Tyrone Larson, Tom Clarkson, Kyle Carpenter, Mary Kay Botkins, Barry Rhodes, Jane Peiser, Joy Tanner, Ronan Kyle Peterson, Tom Turner, Mike Ball, Emily Reason, Mary Mikkelsen & Henry Pope, Becca Floyd, Billy Brown, Alex Matisse, Rob Pulleyn, and Josh Copus.


Works by Joy Tanner

For directions and information about exhibiting potters visit (www.pottersofmadisoncounty.com).

From the Ashes of Many Kilns, Seagrove, NC, the Center of Pottery in North Carolina, Rises Every Spring

April 5, 2012

Now that’s something to think about. When you finish scratching your head – I’ll explain.

When you have to write about annual events, unlike the organizers who can just slap a number in front of the event’s name – we in the media – the elite media – have to come up with a clever hook. In this case I wish I had one in the kiln – cooking until it was ripe for reading. Unfortunately we’ll have to go with this one.


Work from Whynot Pottery

Potters in Seagrove are like the makers of Doritos – you can buy all you want – they’ll just keep making more. And, who can ever have enough pottery – especially the kind they make in Seagrove. When you have near a hundred competitors in a small community like Seagrove, unlike Doritos – you can’t keep cranking out the same old, same old – they’re always producing something different – different shapes, different clays, different glazes, and different patterns. That’s why people keep going back – you want to see what they’re cookin’ up now.


Work by Ben Owen III

Some people say I go to Seagrove too much. I say – tell me where I can go and see so much variety in such concentration? And, when they’re having a special organized event – all the better. Hey, I’m not saying Seagrove is the end of the world as far as pottery goes. I’ve seen some pottery in my day in other places in the Carolinas. Some of my best pieces didn’t come from Seagrove and some came from places far from Seagrove. There’s lots of great pottery being made all over the Carolinas with a heavy concentration in North Carolina, but the difference is…

The folks in Seagrove talk the talk and walk the walk. They go the extra mile to invite people to come there. They want to be number one and they work hard at it. I don’t wear blinders when I’m looking around the Carolinas. I see what’s going on and there’s no place promoting itself like Seagrove. I’m waiting for some other region to stand up and say – “Hey – what about us?” and then back it up. I’ve been waiting.


Work by Chad Brown

And like the old gun-slingers of the West – if you want to be number one – you have to be better every time to stay on top.

That’s why I’m big on Seagrove and have no problem telling people to go there and saying you won’t be disappointed you did – as far as the pottery goes. Seagrove as a town doesn’t have much to offer (nor does the town I live near), but I’m not telling you to go there for anything but the pottery and some pretty good scenery. And, with very few exceptions – they’re some pretty great people there too, but that’s a story for another day – the exceptions I mean.


Work by Bruce Gholson

If you’ve been there – you know what I’m talking about. If you’ve never been there – my gosh – what are you waiting for?

If all the stars and planets line up – I might even get to go there for this event. That’s right – another trip to Seagrove. How about you?

Here’s the official press release:

Editor’s Note: If you think my number of potters don’t match up with those mentioned in the press release, there are potters who don’t participate in all events and those few exceptions I mentioned. Also, one suggestion. Your best first stop on Saturday could be the NC Pottery Center. They have the scoop on the area and some nice exhibits too.

Celebration of Seagrove Potter’s Spring Kiln Openings Cool Off in Seagrove, NC – Apr. 21 & 22, 2012

The 4th Annual Celebration of Seagrove Potter’s Spring Kiln Openings will take place in and around Seagrove, NC, on Apr. 21 and 22, 2012. The event features the work of 65 potters representing 36 different potteries.

The Seagrove potters’ studios are nestled throughout the countryside – separated by short leisurely drives in and nearby the town of Seagrove.  At the various Seagrove potteries there will be special kiln openings and exhibits, new pottery works featured, demonstrations, and refreshments planned for the pottery lover.

Pick up a full-color Discover Seagrove map and guide at any of the Seagrove potters’ shops participating in the Spring Celebration. Each shop is celebrating Spring in its own way. Hours may differ from shop to shop.

Participating potteries include: Southern Spirits Pottery @ A. Teague Village, Avery Pottery & Tileworks, Ben Owen Pottery, Blue Hen Pottery, BlueStone Pottery, Bulldog Pottery, Caldwell-Hohl Artworks, Chris Luther Pottery, Crystal King Pottery, Dean and Martin Pottery, Dirt Works Pottery, Donna Craven Pottery, Eck McCanless Pottery, Fireshadow Pottery, From the Ground Up Pottery, Great White Oak Gallery, Hickory Hill, JLK Jewelry at Jugtown, Johnston & Gentithes Art Pottery, Jugtown Pottery, Kings Pottery, Lathams Pottery, Luck’s Ware, Lufkin Pottery, McNeill’s Pottery, Michele Hastings & Jeff Brown Pottery, Nichols Pottery, O’Quinn Pottery, Pottery by Frank Neef, Ray Pottery, Seagrove Stoneware, Smith Pottery, Studio Touya, Thomas Pottery, Tom Gray Pottery, and Whynot Pottery.

For further info visit the Seagrove Area Potters Association at (http://www.discoverseagrove.com/) or visit (http://www.celebrationofseagrovepotters.com).

City of Columbia, SC’s Art Center Offers First Annual Spring Raku Festival and Open House – Apr. 14, 2012

April 4, 2012

The City of Columbia, SC’s Art Center is hosting its First Annual Spring Raku Festival and Open House on Saturday Apr.14, 2012. The Raku Festival is open to the public from 11am to 5pm at the Art Center & Backman Gallery, located at 1932 Calhoun Street, Columbia, SC.

There will be demonstrations from 5 RAKU artists including Alexander “Sasha” Federer (Feather Pottery & Interiors), Dr. Alexander Wilds (Benedict College), John Homewood (Homewood Hardwoods), David Wingo Sr. (A Touch of Glass), and the City of Columbia Art Center (Mike Van Houten, Mary Ann Myers and Tim Graham).  There is no admission charge for this event.

The Raku pottery firing process is a rapid technique in which a glazed ceramic vessel is heated to nearly 2,000 degrees then removed from the kiln when the glaze is red hot and molten and placed in a chamber with combustible material. After the material ignites, the chamber is sealed and flames consume the oxygen within resulting in unusual and beautiful metallic colors and surface effects.

Event participants can purchase one of the bisque pottery pieces created by the Art Center artists. They can glaze their bisque piece with the special Raku glazes and give to the kiln operator and observe the Raku process. While you are waiting for the piece to be fired, there are demonstrations to observe on throwing, glazing and hand building pottery as well as the Raku process.

There will also be available pottery ready to purchase and take home with you as well as on-going presentations about the art of Raku.

For further information contact Brenda Oliver, Cultural Arts Specialist by calling 803/545-3093 or e-mail to (bloliver@columbiasc.net).